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Sunday 25 September 2016
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NHS CB Chair admits he hasn't read DH risk register

NHS CB Chair Malcolm Grant on risk register

The NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB) Chair has confirmed he hasn't seen the now-vetoed transitional risk register for the government's health reforms.

Despite not reading the DH document, Professor Malcolm Grant said by viewing the NHS CB's own risk register, which includes "pages and pages of red", he is aware of the risks involved.

Grant attracted criticism for a series of bizarre statements made during his speech at the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) 2012 conference on Tuesday (15 May).

He likened the transitional year of the health reforms, where many people will be trying to fulfill dual roles, like "trying to change the wheel of a bicycle while hurtling downhill".

"These reforms are a completely different model of healthcare and we will inevitably be feeling our way for some time," he said.

A misjudged link between avoidable hospital admissions and GPs playing golf showed Grant at his most controversial yet.

Chair GP and comedian Dr Phil Hammond, countered Grant, claiming it was a "very unlikely scenario" and a stereotype he "would have to lose".

Professor Grant continued, agreeing it was unlikely but maintaining it does happen "in some places".

Sir John Oldham, GP and Head of the DH's QIPP Programme, slammed Grant's comments on social networking site Twitter.

"Malcolm Grant jibed about GPs spending too much time on golf course. He should get out of London hospital more," he tweeted.

The NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB) Chair has confirmed he hasn't seen the now-vetoed transitional risk register for the government's health reforms.

Despite not seeing the risk register, Professor Malcolm Grant said he has seen "pages and pages of red" and so claims he is aware of the risks involved.

Grant attracted criticism for a series of bizarre statements made during his speech at the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) 2012 conference on Tuesday (15 May).

He likened the transitional year of the health reforms, where many people will be trying to fulfill dual roles, like "trying to change the wheel of a bicycle while hurtling downhill".

"These reforms are a completely different model of healthcare and we will inevitably be feeling our way for some time," he said.

A misjudged link between avoidable hospital admissions and GPs playing golf showed Grant at his most controversial yet.

Chair GP and comedian Dr Phil Hammond, countered Grant, claiming it was a "very unlikely scenario" and a stereotype he "would have to lose".

Professor Grant continued, agreeing it was unlikely but maintaining it does happen "in some places".

Sir John Oldham, GP and Head of the DH's QIPP Programme, slammed Grant's comments on social networking site Twitter.

"Malcolm Grant jibed about GPs spending too much time on golf course. He should get out of London hospital more," he tweeted.